Online Travel Agencies – Benefits and Disadvantages

When it comes to the choice between using an online travel agency or not for your next trip, there are several factors to consider with several pros and cons.

One of the main concerns that seem to arise with online travel agencies is the trustworthiness and security of paying such large amounts of money online. While online security is a major factor for any online travel agency, this is true of all online businesses. So it is more a matter of choosing a travel agency online with a quality reputation by looking at their customer reviews and seeing what their actual site itself is like. What's more, when you are logging on and preparing to pay for any online costs, there should always be that small symbol of a lock at the bottom right hand side of the screen as a sign of the level of security attached.

The benefits of using online travel agencies are those like their physical counterparts, they are available at any time, ideal for emergency travel situations, and also for any late after-hours bookings that you need to complete. Additionally you can compare travel deals and special available all over the world in order to find the very best deal for you and your travels. What this means is that while a physical travel agency will have a great range of deals for you, they are limited by who they can work with in terms of other travel professionals. With these online agencies, it up to you to decide who you work with, allowing you to create your ideal travel plans.

What you may also find when working with online travel agencies that you will have a great range of methods to pay for the holiday, offering greater flexibility and financial choice. These choices can range from the standard credit cards and accounts to payment plans and travel accounts.

Overall when talking online travel agencies it is more a matter of preference of the customer and how they prefer to do their business, either online or in person, that should dictate how they book their travel plans.

The History of Modern Furniture

It was in the 19th century after the industrial revolution had given birth to a new class of people that modernistic ideas evolved. The traditional dark, gilded or carved wood, covered with heavy richly patterned fabrics cave way to light and simple looking furniture. Between the nobility and the down trodden poor the middle class had emerged.

They cast aside anything that was related to the rich who had trampled the poor ruthlessly. Also influences from Africa, Asia and especially Japan had a lasting effect on designing of modern furniture. Functionality, practicality and economic feasibility were the new order in furniture. Technology and industrial advancement were already playing their role in making of simplistic yet practical furniture.

Michael Thonet an Austrian German cabinet maker was the first to experiment in making bent wood furniture and using glue for joining wood pieces. His coffee shop chair also known as 'Konsumstuhl Nr 14' became world famous and till 1930 over 50 million of these chairs were produced. Another famous chair of that era was the 'Tripolina chair'. It was made of wood, metal and canvas and was patented by Joseph Fendy in 1877. This chair was widely used by the British troops during the colonial period. The director's chair is a simple folding chair that uses a scissor action to fold and is made of wood and canvas, or any other strong material that can bear the weight of the occupant. The design of this chair dates back to the 15th century and the design has been taken from ancient Roman folding stools.

Some of the iconic examples of modern furniture are the Marcel Breur's Wassily chair. This chair uses lightweight tubular steel and leather straps. The exquisite and simplistic design of these geometric shaped planes almost makes the leather straps appear to be suspended in space. The Ellen Gray side table, the Barcelona chair and Noguchi table are some of the other icons of modern furniture.

Modern furniture is functional, practical and tastefully designed to give a feeling of comfort and lightness. It differs completely from the dark and heavily embroidered medieval furniture. Metals, plastics, glass are now used along with wood in making modern furniture and a whole new generation of fabrics and colors are used. The fabrics used are of bold and bright colors which make modern furniture look inviting and artistic. Contemporary furniture has taken many forms and shapes and furniture designers use geometric patterns to create modern furniture.

Most contemporary furniture is lightweight, easy to assemble and disassemble and importantly easy to maintain. Modern furniture also has an individualistic theme, designed to suit the type of décor people want for their homes and workplaces. Colors are popularly used to make a room or office appear pleasant and relaxing. Drab, dreary and heavy colors are no longer used. If a heavy color like black is used, it will be contrasted with white or shining steel. It is modern furniture that has changed the look of the home from a formal and staid place to a casual and relaxing environment.

The Comparison of VR Glass and FPV Glass

VR glasses and virtual reality display headset equipment is a product which used simulation technology and the multimedia technology of computer graphics human-computer interface technology, sensor technology, network technology and other technologies. It’s a new means of human – computer interaction with the help of computer and the latest sensor technology. VR is a cross-time product. Not only make its lover experience it in surprise and curious emotion, but also deeply fascinated for its development.

FPV is the abbreviation of “First Person View”. It is a new game way to play through wearing the FPV glass (the feedback of installing a wireless camera on a remote control aviation model or vehicle model) to control the model on the underground, allowing users to experience the presence of the aircraft.

Although both the VR glass and FPV glass are headset display and the price is expensive, the product characteristics are very different. Most of the game content of the VR glass are designed by the manufacturers, and the plot content or stories are designed by the third part. However, the FPV glass is controlled by the viewers and it can be subjectively move to watch. Most importantly, FPV viewing or activity content is for free. The development path of VR and FPV glass is different.

In general, VR pay more attention to the content but FPV care the hardware equipment much more. Compare with the VR, FPV is ignored by the market at present, but FPV owns more real and strong application. It’s worthy that the relevant manufacturers assess the investment into a market.

Eachine is a famous RC drone brand which is committed to combining the creativity with technology to produce the top-quality RC drones at the best possible prices. It keeps in step with the times to produce the products meet the needs of the market.

Next, I’ll suggest the FPV glass and VR glass I had played for you.

Eachine EV800

It looks that Eachine has focused not only on racing quadcopters but also on specific accessories. This Eachine EV800 is their 3rd FPV goggle. The biggest “invention” of this model, is the 2:1 design which allows to use the EV800 as FPV glasses but also as regular 5″ FPV display. The 6 mm tripod screw hole allows installing the screen on a tripod and us it in a very comfortable way.

Thanks to the integrated 40CH 5.8G FPV receiver with Race Band, this FPV goggles are compatible with almost any 5.8G FPV transmitter. Unfortunately, there is no HDMI input like on the Eachine Goggles One, so can’t be used with DJI Phantom 3 and Phantom 4.

The Eachine EV800 features a 5″ LCD display with 800 x 480 pixels and 140/120 degree viewing angle. On the top front part of the EV800 FPV glasses are located, beside the RP-SMA antenna connector, the control buttons.

Eachine VR D2 Pro

The product comes with a mushroom antenna and a flat plated antenna, with which the receiving distance and stability can be effectively improved. Of course, you can shut down one of the channel and only get A channel or B channel to work in order to get a longer standby time.

Product Characteristics:

·Automatic channel search by pressing one button and accurate channel search in menu

·5inch LCD display

·Adjustable focus

·Built-in DVR,real-recording& playback

·Real-time display of the current battery voltage, frequency and signal strength

·Maximum support 64GB TF card

·Flexible head band is ergonomic design and easy to adjust and comfortable to wear

·Can be mounted on tripod

Race, Ethnicity, and Participation in Leisure Activities

In "Gender and Leisure" by Susan Shaw and "Ethnicity, Race, and Leisure" by James H. Gramann and Maria T. Allison, the authors describe major ways in which race, ethnicity, and gender influence access and participation in recreation and leisure .

While distinctions of gender are fairly clear in examining the differences between males and females, despite the emergence of a transgendered community, a key difficulty in assessing the impact of race and ethnicity is the way these are defined. That's because of a growing multicultural society in the US, Europe, the UK and Canada, which are blurring traditional and ethnic distinctions. But, putting those difficulties aside, this article first discusses the influence of gender and then of race and ethnicity.

As Shaw points out, there are three main ways in which gender has influenced leisure – in terms of activity participation, the gendered nature of leisure constitutions, and through gendered outcomes of leisure. The activity approach has shown that a number of activities are stereotyped according to gender, and that there have been differences in "opportunities, experiences, and a time for leisure." For example, as can be readily observed by anyone who goes to a sports event or visits museums, art galleries, and public lectures, as confirmed by the research, there is a greater participation by men in "sports and physical activities" and by women In "arts and cultural activities." Then, too, there is a gendered nature to passive leisure, which affects the books, magazines, and film men and women read and view, as well as the hobbies and crafts they participate in. While Shaw notes that little research has examined these differences, these distinctions based on gender can already be seen in the way marketers target certain types of books, such as those on self-help and relationships to women, and those on sports and business to men . Similarly, films dealing with romance and relationships are targeted to women, and films featuring adventure and action to men.

Also, confirming what has been evident to the general public, in modern industrialized societies, men have generally had more time to participate in leisure activities, because of what sociologist Arlie Hochschild, who I studied with at UC Berkeley, calls the "second shift. " This is because working and married women have generally taken on most of the household and childcare chores at home, so they not only have participated in the paid work, but when they come home, they work again. Meanwhile, since they have been less engaged than women in the household, the men get to enjoy additional leisure time, thanks to their women partners.

However, these studies cited by Shaw about women having less leisure time were done in the 1980s and 1990s. In recent years, this distinction between the leisure time for men and women seems to be changing, according to the popular media, in that men are more importantly involved in splitting up the housework and parenting. This shift is even reflected in the popular media, where the men end up with the kids and learn to enjoy being dads, such as Once Fallen. At the same time, successful women workers are hiring nannies to do the housework and care for their kids and even hiring surrogates to birth them.

As for constraints, these differently affect the opportunities men and women have for leisure. For example, the 1980s and 1990s research cited has shown that women are more constrained than men because of household obligations and family commitments, and because they feel a social obligation due to the "ethic of care," where women may feel an obligation to care For others, so they feel less free to enjoy leisure for themselves. Then, too, women may feel constrained from participating in certain types of activities, because of their fear of violence (such as in boxing and wrestling) or their concern with their body image (such as in swimming), while men may resist participating in Activities that seem too feminine and threaten them masculinity (such as ballet).

When it comes to race and ethnicity, it is more complicated to measure either participation or constitutions, because of the problems in classifying people by race or ethnicity. These classification problems have occurred because of ethnic and racial diversity and multiculturalism, so the old census racial classifications are breaking down, as pointed out by Gramann and Allison. But those complications aside, much of the research has focused on the different ways that different ethnic and racial groups participate in outdoor recreation, and the results have indicated that Whites tend to participate more in these activities than minority group members. While one reason that many minority group members do not participate is due to their marginal position in society, wheree they have a lower income and can not afford to participate, have poor transportation, or fear discrimination, another factor may be cultural differences. Certainly, marginality could be a factor for those with limited incomes, when they have to pay substantial amounts to participate in leisure activities that are mostly participating in by Whites, such as going to dinners in expensive restaurants or paying entry fees for theater and other cultural Events.

But another key factor, apart from income and social class is that the members of racial and ethnic groups may have their own "culturally based value system, norms, and leisure socialization patterns," so they have different interests. An example of this can be seen in areas of ethnic concentration, such as Oakland, where there is a Chinatown in the downtown area, African-American areas in Western and East Oakland, and Latin-American areas in the Fruitvale district. In each area, there are different types of activities that appeal to those in the ethnic groups in the area, such as the dragon boat races of the Chinese, the Kwanza celebration of the African-Americans, and the Day of the Dead celebration of Mexican -Americans. Also, members of the different groups may like reading books and magazines as well as viewing films that feature their own racial or cultural group, whereas Whites are less likely to be interested in these culturally-based types of entertainment. As Gramann and Allison point out, such racially and ethnic based choices of leisure may occur because they are "expressions of culture" or they may be an indication of "selective acculturation". Then too, these culturally-based forms of leisure could be examples of "ethnic boundary maintenance," where individuals individuals chose to engage in certain activities to highlight their ethnic differences, such as when Native Americans have pow-wows around the country to celebrate their tribal Identities.